Friday, 13 July 2018

BLOG TOUR: Review of 'Access All Awkward' by Beth Garrod

Hey there, my fellow book nerds. Today I'm thrilled to be taking part in the blog tour for Bella Fisher's latest adventure in Access All Awkward by Beth Garrod. My thoughts on this hilarious book are below!

Pages: 450
Format: Paperback
Publisher: Scholastic
Genre: Humor, Contemporary
Release Date: July 3rd 2018
Buy The Book: Book Depository - A Great Read

Bella Fisher is stuck in EXAM HELL - with only the promise of a weekend at the RebelRocks festival with her mates as a reward afterwards. OK, so she can't actually afford a ticket and will have to work as a litter picker and toilet scrubber, but it's still going to be epic: the best bands, her best friends and best-boy-in-the-world Adam, with not a parent or teacher in sight. But when she arrives to find annoying older sister Jo has been sent by Mum to keep an eye on her, things go from bad to worse. BFF Rachel is hanging out with some mean girls, awful ex-boyfriend Luke pitches up with his model girlfriend and her pristine Hunter wellies, and the drummer in her favourite band is exposed as a sexist pig. All the face glitter and flower crowns in the world can't save the day... can they?

In Bella's latest adventure, she's stressing over her exams before spending some of her summer working at the RebelRocks music festival in her town. During the festival, Bella and her friends find themselves with even more work to do. They want the world's hottest new boyband, The Session, to apologise for treating their fans, and women in general, like dirt.

The love I have in my heart for these characters is unreal. Bella is utterly hilarious and her narration of the story had me laughing so much. The situations she finds herself in! It's impossible not to love her and her group of friends. Their friendship is always such a central plot within this series and it's focused heavily upon in this book too. I adore Rach and Teegan as much as I adore Bella.

Bella's family are once again amazing in this third book. Their group chat is definitely a highlight in the story. What's especially great about them is that they always work through things together and stand by one and other. It makes for some lovely, heart-warming scenes.

  • REALISTIC TEENAGE CHARACTERS. I never like it when YA characters come across as older than they should be, unless there's a specific plot which revolves around them having to be maturer from a young age. So I adore the fact that Beth writes her teen characters in such a perfect way. Yes, there's a lot of caps lock, and yes the characters shorten or, in Bella's case, join words, and yes they use plenty of references. WHICH IS EXACTLY WHAT YA CHARACTERS SHOULD DO. It makes them so much more authentic that way.
  • HEALTHY ROMANCE. I can't write this review without giving a shoutout to the way relationships are handled in this series. Yay for healthy relationships in YA that are positive and in which the characters deal with their problems in a good way! There were so many moments between Bella and Adam that made me want to hug this book.
  • ONE LINERS THAT MAKE YOU HOWL. There are lots of lines I want to put in this review but won't because A) this is a spoiler-free zone and B) you absolutely have to read them for yourself. There were just so many little things that had me in tears. 

I don't want to say too much plot-wise, but I just need to say that I couldn't be more happy with the very ending of the story. Because it's not what I expected to happen, but is exactly what I was hoping for. Again, it goes to show how much it pays off to be realistic in YA stories, especially contemporary ones. Despite the humorous nature of this book, it deals with some very real issues that we have in our society in general, and it also deals with problems that young people who are taking exams and worrying about the future have to face It demonstrates that it doesn't matter if things don't happen as you planned, you can still make things work. And this book manages to do all of that as well as being perfectly hilarious. I couldn't ask for more in a YA story.

Royal Rating:

Be sure to check out the other fantastic bloggers taking part in the tour:



Wednesday, 13 June 2018

I'M CHOPPING MY HAIR

For once, I'm publishing a post that isn't about books! Shocking, I know. Me, not talking about books every second of every day? A rare occurrence only witnessed every thirteen years on a full moon during a time ofANYWAY, today I want to write about A Thing that I'm doing, and I'd be super grateful if you could give it a read anyway. 


My hair has always been my pride and joy. For a long time, it's been the only part of how I look that I've gained any confidence from because it was always something that I was happy with. It's also always been long. From the moment I was old enough to start making my own decisions about my hair, I've grown it. My idea of a trip to the hairdressers would be getting the slightest trim which would leave my Mum asking the same question every time I'd come home: “Did you even get a haircut???”

A couple of years ago, I finally grew tired of the constant terrible dye jobs I was doing on my hair and decided to embrace my natural colour again. To do that, I had to grow it out so that I could fully get rid of the colours, especially the red, that I'd been throwing on it for literal years. So now I have my natural hair back and it's probably the longest I've had it before.

Long hair has been my 'look' for, well, a really long time!

So before making my usual appointment for a trim last year, I stopped and actually thought about the length of my hair for once. Would it really matter if it wasn't as long? I'm so lucky that I get to grow my hair, have a trim, then a few months later be back at the length I started. I'm so lucky that I get to put colour in my hair without a second thought because even if it goes terribly wrong and I end up looking like a little bit of an idiot for a while, it'll still grow out. There are so many children who can't grow their hair, so many young adults who can't experiment with different styles and not think twice about it. There are too many people who have to lose their hair in the cruelest ways. My hair is just a thing to me and I might love it a lot, but it could mean the world to someone else. 

From that point on, I continued growing my hair with the intention of making it something that someone else could be proud of. My hair is the one thing that helps me feel happy about the way I look, but now it's someone else's turn to feel that way.

Long hair has always been my defining feature

My hair has recently reached my waist, and pretty soon it'll be ready to go to a new and deserving home. In August, I'll be cutting and donating around 13 inches to the Little Princess Trust so it can be turned into a natural wig for children who need it far more than I do. In the meantime, I've set up a JustGiving page with the hopes of raising some money for this wonderful charity that helps to give young people the princess hair they deserve. It costs on average between £350-£500 for a wig to be made, which will then be given to a child who needs it for free.

Today is my birthday, and I couldn't ask for a better present than for people to help me raise money for a great charity. If you could contribute even just a little, or share the page so it reaches as many people as possible, I'd be so grateful.

Together we can help the Little Princess Trust bring a smile to young faces.


Thursday, 7 June 2018

REVIEW: Noah Could Never by Simon James Green

Pages: 320
Format: Paperback
Publisher: Scholastic
Topics: Humour, Teen Love
Release Date: June 7th 2018
Buy The Book: Book Depository

Noah and Harry are now officially boyfriends, but is Noah ready to go all the way? It's no help that a group of cosmopolitan French exchange students have descended on Little Fobbing - including sexy Pierre Victoire, who seems to have his eye on Harry! Meanwhile, Noah's paired up with a girl ... who, most outrageously, is not even French. But that's not all: the police are monitoring Noah, and he can't tell if it's because his dad and secret half-brother, Eric, have made off with his gran's fake diamonds; because his PE teacher is receiving mysterious cash infusions from Russia; or because drag queen Bambi Sugapops is hiding out at Noah's house in the midst of a knock-down, bare-knuckled drag feud. Will Noah ever catch a break?

Listen. You have no idea how much I've been looking forward to getting my hands on a copy of this sequel. In case you didn't already know, I adore Noah Can't Even. I love it so much that I scream about it online and recommend it whenever I get the chance. You can officially consider me to be a Noah Grimes Enthusiast. So to say I was pretty damn excited for this book is a bit of an understatement.

Noah Could Never picks up a little while after the events of the first book. Noah and Harry are now officially a couple and all is going well, apart from Noah's constant self doubt, that is. Obviously, I'm not going to go into the plot too much because I really don't want to spoil any of the amazing and completely wild surprises that get thrown at the characters, so I'll keep my fangirling spoiler-free. Just know that I loved the plot very much and it's just so FUN. You literally cannot predict anything that is going to happen in this book. It's impossible. It's also a very difficult book to review because honestly all I want to do is ASDFGHJKL;

actually me trying to write this review

You probably don't need me to confirm for you that this book is as hilarious as the first one, maybe even more so. Honestly. I was almost in tears laughing just a few pages in. I CAN'T COPE WITH THE HUMOUR IN THESE BOOKS.

Things I have learned reading Noah Could Never:
  1. Try to avoid reading it surrounded by family who are going to question why you keep grinning down at the book in your lap like the biggest dork in the world.
  2. READ WITH CAUTION ON PUBLIC TRANSPORT. I sincerely hope the poor commuters sitting across from me on the train didn't catch me fighting back the giggles. There are just certain scenes in this book that CANNOT be read in public. IT'S JUST TOO FUNNY FOR THAT, OKAY?

You also don't need me to reiterate how much I love Noah. I can't help but adore him, even when he's making huge mistakes which you know he's going to end up regretting. I didn't expect to relate to him, but the feelings of self doubt that he has really hit home more than I was ready for! He goes through a lot of moments when he feels like he doesn't deserve Harry, and believing he needs to be a better version of himself, trying various ways to change himself to what he thinks is deemed 'perfect'. Something that I really loved about this book is how, despite all of the laughs and wild situations, there were genuinely heartfelt moments between characters, and some very real issues were dealt with in a lighthearted way. Noah Could Never has a very cute message within its pages.

Whilst I'm talking about characters. Bambi. An incredible edition to this series. Just when you think this story couldn't get any better, we get introduced to the greatest drag queen Little Fobbing has ever seen, with perfect comedic timing and a wonderful catalogue of innuendos (though Pierre might just win the title of Best Innuendo Provider). 

  • Cutest characters you will ever meet. Honestly. How do people get through life without reading about Noah and Harry.
  • LITERALLY THE FUNNIEST. We all need a good, funny story every now and then. No matter what genre you usually read, it's always a good idea to pick up a book that's guaranteed to make you smile.
  • French exchange students because every good YA story needs French exchange students at some point.
  • Millie and the Dickheads. That's all I'm saying.

    Noah Could Never is the perfect sequel. It really is. After all this waiting, it didn't disappoint. From a dodgy protein shake business to a road trip with a drag queen, this book throws so many unexpected yet utterly hilarious situations at the characters, and it's glorious. Hands down my favourite book of 2018 so far. If you haven't had a chance to read the first book, Noah Can't Even, but happen to be reading this review anyway: PLEASE PICK IT UP. It's the perfect read for Pride Month, and trust me when I say that it will make you smile. 

    Royal Rating:

    Monday, 21 May 2018

    REVIEW: The Girl in the Broken Mirror by Savita Kalhan

    Pages: 288
    Format: Paperback
    Publisher: Troika Books
    Release Date: March 28th 2018
    Topics: Sexual Abuse, Culture
    Buy The Book: Book Depository 

     Jay's creative writing exercise is to write a fairy tale, to end with 'they lived happily ever after'. But the way her life is panning out she's not sure it will ever reach that stage. A powerful moving gripping story which explores themes of family, loyalty and culture clash but is ultimately about hope and understanding.

    WARNING: Due to the nature of the story, this review mentions the main character being a victim of rape. Please feel free to skip out on this review if you need to.

    It's impossible to go into this story expecting a light read. It deals with some seriously tough subjects, and it doesn't shy away from the details. We're shown from the very first chapter that this is going to be a difficult journey, but it's such an important one.

    The Girl in the Broken Mirror deals with the rape of teenager Jay after she and her mother, Neela, are left with no choice but to move in with relatives who follow a much more strict Indian lifestyle than what Jay is used to. Left with no other choice, Jay has to change the way she acts when she's under her aunt's roof.

    Jay is a perfect example of how an ordinary girl with an ordinary life can be thrown into such extreme circumstances. Her life is so seemingly normal until suddenly, it isn't. There was nothing she and her mother could have done to change their circumstances, and I understand why her mother made the decision to live with family members. She thought she was doing what was best for her daughter and had no way of knowing what the outcome would be. Like a lot of horrible things in life, it progressed too quickly and silently to be stopped by those around it.

    The relationship between Jay and her mother was a complex one that was tested many times over the course of the story. There was a chapter towards the end in which we got a bit more insight from Neela's point of view, and it was important that we got to see her thought process leading up to her finding out about the attack.

    Although Sita was a character who only appeared in the final quarter of the book, she was one of my favourites. Her character was necessary for reminding us of the goodness we can find in the people around us. Something we needed after the harsh occurrences earlier in the story.

    The thing that really stuck out to me about this book was how it covered so much of the story. We were shown the build up to the attack, as well as the aftermath. The YA books I've read in the past that contained the rape of a main character tend not to show as much of the aftermath as I'd like to see. I love it when a story shows that there is a life after horrible attacks like this one, that there is hope for those people to take control of their situation again. Whilst some of the scenes with Jay after the attack were heartbreaking and difficult to read, I love that this book showed us that she had a new chapter in her life beyond the final pages.

    This is such a powerful story and an example of some of the horrible situations young women can actually find themselves in. At the start of the book, Jay would never have been able to imagine the attack she was about to be faced with, and yet it happened regardless. It was also an important look into culture and a male orientated world. I'm so grateful to Savita for writing this story because it very much needed to be told.

    Royal Rating:

    Monday, 14 May 2018

    BLOG TOUR: Q&A with Savita Kalhan, author of The Girl in the Broken Mirror

    Hello, fellow bookworms! Today I'm thrilled to be taking part in the blog tour for The Girl in the Broken Mirror with a Q&A from the writer herself, Savita Kalhan!

    Hi Katie, thank you so much for inviting me here on your blog today! It’s so exciting having The Girl in the Broken Mirror out in the world – and then taking it on a blog tour with amazing bloggers like you!

    Hi, Savita! Can you tell us a little bit about your novel, The Girl in the Broken Mirror?
    The Girl in the Broken Mirror is about a Jay, 15 year old British Asian girl, who goes from riches to rags, and from a liberal home to a super-strict traditional Indian home where she struggles to fit in. Then she is brutally assaulted by a relative and her life implodes. It’s a story of love and loss, of a girl and her mother, of guilt, of betrayal, but ultimately it’s a story of hope and where help can be found even in the darkest moments of life.

    Jay is such an interesting character who faces a lot of tough situations, what was it that inspired you to write her story?
    In many ways, I was like Jay. Without going into details, I faced a few of the tough situations in my life that Jay faces in the book. This was a story that I had never read when I was growing up. I didn’t even know of any British Asian writers, and kids like me never saw ourselves in books. I didn’t know that the struggle I was going through was not unique to me – and I’m not just talking about the culture clash, which is a big enough subject on its own.

    There is also that issue of male patriarchy, which exists in many communities, where boys and men are considered to be better than girls and women. Growing up thinking in that way, whether you are a boy or a girl, is not the way forward.

    All of these reasons made me want to write Jay’s story for YA readers.

    The Girl in the Broken Mirror deals with some very serious topics, what sort of research did you do when preparing to write the story?
    Some books require lots of research. This book required very little. I had the background for almost all the story. With the #metoo and #timesup movement, it’s so easy, and horrifying, to find the rape and sexual assault stats. It was really important to me to add the names of all the charities and help lines who can help anyone facing the things that Jay goes through. I don’t want girls going through difficult situations to think they are alone – and it doesn’t matter which community they come from, I’m talking about ALL girls.

    Why do think Jay's story needed to be told?
    It’s a story that hasn’t been told before. In fact there are very few YA stories that deal with the rape or sexual assault. Anne Cassidy’s No Virgin and Louise O’Neill’s Asking For It are pretty much the only two in UKYA. Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson was the first book I read about rape – it’s an incredibly moving book and I highly recommend it. As for a story with a young British Asian girl as the protagonist, there were none.


    What was the most difficult part of the writing process for you, and what was the most rewarding?
    The Girl in the Broken Mirror was probably the hardest book I’ve ever written. To write about the themes that are in the book without being graphic, without being sensationalist or insincere, or overly sentimental, was hard. Finding the right title of the story was difficult too – there were several working titles before I found the right one for the book.

    The most rewarding part of the writing process was the final edit and the feedback – that was SO incredibly rewarding!

    Finally, what do you hope readers will take away from your story?
    I hope it helps readers understand the struggle some teens face living with two cultures – one at home and the other outside.

    The culture clash struggle is not just confined to Asian kids growing up in two cultures – it’s about all teens facing clashes of conflicting views, ideas, opinions with a different generation. Understanding what it is can help in some way in dealing with it.

    I would like boys to read the book too as it’s so important for them to know the boundaries, recognise the consequences, the repercussions and the terrible pain of the trauma someone like Jay goes through.

    Ultimately, I want readers to take hope with them at the end of the story. There is always hope.

    Thanks so much for having me here, Katie! If your readers want to know anything more about me or The Girl in the Broken Mirror, here’s my website www.savitakalhan.com, or I’m always happy to chat on Twitter @savitakalhan

    A huge thank you to the lovely Savita for stopping by! My review of this powerful story will be posted very soon. Be sure to check out the rest of the wonderful blogs taking part in the tour:

    Tuesday, 17 April 2018

    REVIEW: Fragments of the Lost by Megan Miranda

    Pages: 384
    Format: ARC Paperback
    Publisher: Crown Books
    Topics: Mystery, Missing People
    Release Date: January 16th 2018 (US)
    Buy The Book: Book Depository - A Great Read

    Jessa Whitworth knew she didn't belong in her ex-boyfriend Caleb's room. But she couldn't deny that she was everywhere: in his photos, his neatly folded T-shirts, even the butterfly necklace in his jeans pocket . . . the one she gave him for safe keeping on that day.

    His mother asked her to pack up his things, even though she blames Jessa for his accident. How could she say no? And maybe, just maybe, it will help her work through the guilt she feels about their final moments together.

    But as Jessa begins to box up the pieces of Caleb's life, they trigger memories that make Jessa realize their past relationship may not be exactly as she remembered. And she starts to question whether she really knew Caleb at all.

    Each fragment of his life reveals a new clue that propels Jessa to search for the truth about Caleb's accident. What really happened on the storm-swept bridge?

    Well, this was quite a rollercoaster of a story. With it's twists and turns leading me all over the place, I was never sure exactly which direction it was going to take, leaving me constantly growing suspicious and pointing fingers at almost every character.

    Fragments of the Lost takes place after the disappearance of Caleb Evers, and follows his ex-girlfriend Jessa as she clears his room away for his family as they prepare to move. A lot of the story is set within Caleb's bedroom and told through memories that the two of them shared. But the more things Jessa discovers in his room, the more she starts analysing the parts of Caleb's life that she was allowed to see.

    I'll be completely honest, at first I thought this book was going to be my cup of tea. Whilst I do love a good thriller, I don't read them too often, and this one didn't manage to draw me in straight away considering it was mostly Jessa's memories of their relationship for the first quarter of the book. But the more Jessa tore apart Caleb's room, the more hooked I became. Instead of getting answers, we're given more mysteries, and Jessa starts to realise that she only got to see a small part of Caleb's complex life.

    Jessa was a character who I didn't feel too connected to at the start of the story, but I grew to like her more and more. She was just a normal girl who happened to get swept up into a very complicated world. I enjoyed seeing her interactions with those around her change as the story progressed.

    There wasn't one character who I wasn't suspicious of at some point or another. In fact, for quite a big chunk of the story, I was absolutely convinced that a minor character had something to do with Caleb's disappearance, when it turned out they were actually just a perfectly innocent minor character. I really thought I was cleverly on to something, but I couldn't have been more further from the truth!

    Whilst the overall story isn't scary, there were certain scenes in this that left me chilled. Especially as Jessa investigated parts of Caleb's past. There were moments when I really didn't know who to trust, so I had no idea whether any of the characters were potentially going to bring harm to Jessa, and it definitely had me on edge! That feeling of unease was what kept me turning the pages of this book, and it made for a brilliantly atmospheric read. 

    Royal Rating:

    Monday, 2 April 2018

    EVENT RECAP: An Afternoon With Holly Black

    Unless you've been hiding under a rock for the past few months, you'll probably have noticed a lot of people discussing Holly Black's latest novel, The Cruel Prince. I've been desperate, and I mean desperate, to get my hands on a copy, but my very broke self hasn't been able to purchase any new books lately. So when I saw that the wonderful Waterstones in Liverpool was hosting a competition for a free ticket to Holly's event, including a copy of the book, I hit that retweet button so fast. For once, luck was actually on my side and I WON.


    Literally two hours before the event, I found out on Twitter that I was one of the two winners, so I had an hour to throw some clothes on and make myself look presentable because I WAS ABOUT TO MEET HOLLY BLACK. Somehow I still managed to get to the store super early, and bagged myself a seat at the very front. I always try to arrive early to get front row at these things because my short self would spend the whole time craning to see over not-short people the whole time otherwise.

    On my way in, I was given this absolutely gorgeous goodie back containing a copy of the book (!!!!!!!!!) and some very exciting swag, which I had a nosey at whilst waiting for the talk to start. 

    The goodie bag from the event!
    Look at this beautiful character art!
    Black heart lollipops. I'm always down for free food.
    An adorable bookmark and a candle? This goodie bag is definitely for me. Also: HELLO SEQUEL TEASER.
    A super cute fairyloot badge!
    Holly kicked off the event in dramatic style with a reading of the prologue from The Cruel Prince. After that, she did a short interview with the host of the afternoon, the wonderful Simon from Savidge Reads, talking about all things Faerie. He questioned her about the story revolving around Jude instead of Vivi, whom the prologue seems to focus on more. Holly told us that whilst Vivi seemed to tick all of the right boxes for a classic YA protagonist, in her mind the story had always been about Jude. She wanted to tell a story about a human growing up in an 'other' world, like a reverse-changeling story.

    After the initial interview, the event was handed over to the audience to ask questions. When quizzed about writing a series, Holly's advice was to be careful not to close too many doors too early on in the story because they might be needed further down the line. She was also asked about how she knew a book would end when there is a sequel, and she confessed that The Cruel Prince had originally supposed to finish at another part.

    One of the final questions of the night was about where she got her folklore when planning her stories set in Faerie. She told us that she read books that contained write-ups of people's encounters with faeries. Whether they're real or not, they contain some fascinating information!

    Once the questions were all finished, we were allowed to queue up for the book signing. There was originally someone in front of me in the line, but they left to go and get something, and before I knew it, I was at Holly's table! Not expecting to be first up, I definitely had one of those good old Moments of Panic where I forgot every word that ever existed. My anxious self likes to go over what I'm saying approximately one million times in my head beforehand, so I felt exceptionally Unprepared. Luckily I composed myself enough to tell her that I was super excited to read the book and that I'd seen my fellow bloggers give it so much praise.


    And that was my tale from a very unexpected book signing! This was actually the first book event I'd been to in almost two years, since my anxiety prevented me from going to the last signing that I planned to attend. I'm proud that I managed to make it this time and only mildly freaked out. I need to say a huge thank you to the team at Waterstones Liverpool for the fantastic opportunity, and to Holly for a wonderful afternoon. I'm beyond excited to finally read The Cruel Prince!

     

    Tuesday, 27 March 2018

    The Queen of Teen Fiction has a New Look!

    Do you like what I've done with the place? I sure hope so because it's only taken me since the start of 2018 to redecorate. Since I last changed my blog design in 2015, I figured I'd stuck with the same look for long enough to have earned a change. So one of my goals for this year was to work on a new design, and this time I wanted to completely change things up. As you may have noticed, I've lost my little book queen, who has been on my blog for the best part of seven years. 

    When I first started my blog back in 2011, everyone else seemed to have their own vector boy or girl in their header, and I wanted one too! Which is how my queen came to be. But after all these years, I think it's time to give her a rest. As much as I love her, I felt like it was finally time to go for a more simple and minimalist look.

    It certainly hasn't been easy to get this design the way I wanted it. Back when I first started blogging, I had zero knowledge in design. And I mean literally nothing. I was a complete mess. I was also a very poor mess, which meant I couldn't afford to buy any sort of custom design (i still can't). So I had no choice but to try and learn things myself. Despite my hatred of HTML, I'm super proud of how far I've come in being able to handle my own blog design! As well as the new look, I've also decided to try changing up my reviews a little as well, so stay tuned for some new content in the future.

    Whilst making this new design, I've made use of so many amazing free resources that I've come across online, so I'm hoping to create a masterlist of useful websites for a blog post on design. If any of you have websites you use to help with your own blogs, please feel free to share them in the comments and I'll include them. Hopefully it can make life a little easier for bloggers who want to create their own designs in the future!

    There will probably be more than a few teething problems with the new design over the next few weeks. No matter how many times I check things over, something always manages to go wrong. So if you happen to notice anything acting a little strange on my blog, please do let me know so I can (try to) fix it!


    Tuesday, 6 March 2018

    REVIEW: Tender by Eve Ainsworth

    Pages: 304
    Format: Paperback
    Publisher: Scholastic
    Topics: Realistic Fiction, Illness, Mental Health
    Release Date: March 1st 2018
    Buy The Book: Book Depository - A Great Read

    Touching on mental health, family, friendship and the pressures that teenage carers face, as author Cat Clarke says, TENDER is a compassionate, compelling and unflinching novel . Marty and Daisy spend their lives pretending. Marty pretends his mum's grip on reality isn't slipping by the day. Daisy pretends her parents aren't exhausting themselves while they look after her incurably ill brother. They both pretend they're fine. But the thing about pretending is, at some point, it has to stop. And then what?  


    My Thoughts:
    This story deals with two incredibly difficult living situations for teenagers, Daisy and Marty. Whilst one must deal with the physical battles her family has to face with her brother's muscle wasting disease, the other has to cope with the mental health issues his mother deals with every day. The two contrasting families fight very different things, but somehow Daisy and Marty manage to find common ground in the position their lives have put them both in.

    The two main characters are so interesting to read about. Though it's difficult to see them bury their thoughts and feelings away, I'm glad that as readers, we get to see them finally able to share their worries with each other, and eventually open up to those around them as well. So many younger people like Daisy and Marty are facing situations where they have to give up large parts of their lives to care for those around them.

    This story, although aimed at teenagers, is also an important tool for showing everyone what young carers have to go through. Both Daisy and Marty feel as though they have to hide their own difficulties because they don't want to make a fuss or cause more problems. I can't even begin to imagine what it must be like for people genuinely facing situations like this. I'm so glad that this story was able to show the characters realising that it's okay to think about themselves as well.

    Daisy and Marty find comfort in each other throughout the story and the small amount of romance between them is sweet and refreshing. Ainsworth manages to perfectly capture the butterfly-filled feelings that spark between them. I also adored the scenes that took place in the group for young carers. If there had been more time within the story, I'd have loved to have gotten to know the characters within the group a little more.

    Despite the difficult situations that Tender revolves around, it leaves readers with positive messages that everyone should think about. As the characters learn, we definitely need to start living for the right now because we never know what's going to happen tomorrow. I'm always pleased whenever books include useful information links at the back relating to the subjects covered within the story, which this one did. It's a simple way to provide support and comfort for the readers who might pick up the book whilst struggling with similar situations. 

    Royal Rating:

     

    Friday, 9 February 2018

    REVIEW: Rookie on Love edited by Tavi Gevinson

    Pages: 288
    Format: Paperback
    Publisher: Razorbill
    Genre: Non-fiction, Anthology
    Release Date: January 2nd 2018
    Buy The Book: Book Depository


    A single-subject anthology about the heart's most powerful emotion, edited by Tavi Gevinson. Featuring exclusive, never-before-seen essays, poems, comics, and interviews from contributors like Jenny Zhang, Emma Straub, Hilton Als, Janet Mock, John Green, Rainbow Rowell, Gabourey Sidibe, Mitski, Alessia Cara, Etgar Keret, Margo Jefferson, Sarah Manguso, Durga Chew-Bose, and many more!


    My Thoughts:
    This is a book that really does have something to offer to everyone. A collection of works from various writers and artists, Rookie on Love is packed with a variety of recollections, observations, poems, and even comics, regarding the topic of love. Considering I focus so much on reading fiction, it was refreshing to pick this one up and enjoy something different.

    Despite the book revolving around love, it's not just focused on romantic love. Whilst there are stories of heartbreak and love gone wrong, it also explores family dynamics, our relationships with our friends, and even the love we have for our pets. With relatable writing throughout, there's bound to be something within these pages that you can relate to a little.

    This gorgeously designed book has adorable illustrations throughout, which make it even more special. The comic strip pages were an unexpected surprise that I adored! Especially, OMG, Yay! which focused on small, positive parts of an average day that can make us happy. It's such a cute idea that me smile.

    I won't lie, my favourite work within Rookie on Love is Willis, a devotional to dogs. It's only a few pages long, but it really makes you think about the love our pets have for us, and how much their lives revolve around our decisions. It made my emotional, dog-loving self go and give my own dog the biggest of cuddles.

    Do Sisters Actually Love Each Other? is an interesting piece about sibling relationships and how they evolve. The fact that it's told via text was interesting and made it even more fun to read. I also loved Binary Planets, in which twins Ogechi and Ugochi discuss their experiences growing up. It was fascinating to take this sort of look into the lives of others.


    Another one of my favourites is the conversation between Rainbow Rowell and John Green about writing teen love. It was great to read their thoughts about why they write their love stories the way that they do. Other highlights include a poem by Florence Welch and a piece by Alessia Cara on learning how to love herself first and foremost.

    With such an interesting bunch of pieces from a wonderfully diverse set of contributors, Rookie on Love is the uplifting read that I needed. It's one that can be picked up and delved into anytime, and one with works I'll be sure to go back to and read over again in the future.

    Royal Rating:


    Saturday, 20 January 2018

    7 Books From 2017

    Finally we've put 2017 behind us and have begun a new year! I'm very much looking forward to the reading year ahead, especially with the new sense of determination I have after my not-so-great 2017. But I always like to take the time to reflect on the wonderful books I discovered over the previous year. I did make a video to fully discuss my favourite books from 2017, but for those of you who prefer the good old written word, I've listed them in a blog post, too. So here are my top 7 from 2017!

     

    What books were you loving in 2017? And what books are you looking forward to in the coming year? Let me know!



    Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...